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Posts Tagged ‘Kaui Lucas’

 

It was a mini-reunion of our 2012 ‘Aha Hui o nā Kauka,  Kaho’olawe trip: Kim Ku’ulei Birnie of Papa Ola Lōkahi,  and Elise Dela Cruz-Talbert, an Epidemiology PhD Candidate, at UH Mānoa. In the final segment (last 15 minutes) we talked about the privilege of being there with farmer/activists like Charlie and Paul Reppun, and Vince Dodge, foodies like the Hoe ‘ohana.  For 5 days we ate delicious mostly locally sourced healthy food.  But that is not so easy back in Honolulu.  Birnie and Dela Cruz-Talbert, give sobering numbers. Especially for Native Hawaiians, poor diets mean shorter, sicker lives.
Dela Cruz-Talbert talked about the Healthy_Grindz808 Instagram account and Healthy Grindz Facebook page to help find healthy, inexpensive food. Have a favorite? Post a picture!  Have a meeting at work this week? Skip the poi malasadas and napples. Bring seasonal local fruit like lychee, rambutan, longon, or mountain apple.  If you don’t find something in your budget, a bag of “cuties” tangerines is always easy and unsalted roasted nuts are satisfying.
What was I doing on this Kaho’olawe huaka’i?  I gave a talk on eating, emotions, and self forgiveness; modifying the traditional ceremony with limu kala.  It was the first time I talked openly about dealing with an eating disorder in my teens and 20’s. Disordered eating seems to be increasing in popularity again, and will likely be a theme for a future Hawai’i is My Mainland program.
Kaui Lucas, Kim Ku'ulei Birnie, and Elise Dela Cruz-Talbert,

Kaui Lucas, Kim Ku’ulei Birnie, and Elise Dela Cruz-Talbert in the Think Tech Studio

29.1.1.Population by Ethnicity 1778-2000 (decimation) 29.1.2.Mortality rates for all causes, Kanaka Maoli vs all ethnicities 1990 29.1.3.1.Access to Healthcare 2015 29.1.3.Five leading causes of deaths among Hawaiians, 2002 29.1.5. diet-related-disease-trends-in-hawaii-the-us-and-globally-3-1024 29.1.6diet-related-disease-trends-in-hawaii-the-us-and-globally-6-1024 29.2.1.Comparison of Pre-Western, Prudent Adapted, American Diets - RK Blaisdell, 1985 29.2.2.Factors contributing to health and wellness 29.2.3.Food Access and Nutrition Strategy, NH Health Strategy Map, 2016

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Imu crew.

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Kim Birnie and mo’opuna, good health is a family affair

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The Navigator’s Chair: Paul Reppun, Dr. Noa Emmett Aluli, Kealoha Hoe, Charlie Reppun.

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Memorials for George Helm Jr. and Kimo Mitchell. If you don’t know who they are, Google them.

Picture 495Elise

Everything in moderation.

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Rene Tillich is one of those quiet currents running beneath the surface in our town; energetic juice in the emotional mycelial layer. For more than forty years, his clinic, King Kalakaua Center has been providing the space to cultivate peace and harmony at the core of people’s lives.  It is hard to be really effective out there “in the world” when home base is a battle ground or desolate wasteland.   We all know sparkle corrodes if not addressed.  Tillich gives some theory and practical stratagems for romantic rust prevention and removal. He gets into a couple of the biggies of mature relationships; infidelity and empty nests.  Enjoy this rare “public” appearance from a Harvard and Berkeley (in the 60’s!) trained octogenarian psychologist.

 

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None of this makes logical sense. You don’t build the world’s largest fuel storage facility 100 ft above a sole source aquifer.  Except in wartime, with no significant populated areas nearby. That was the case when these were built in the 1940’s.

Now it seems we are in a new war, over natural resources and public safety vs the Navy’s inertia.  It’s not like there aren’t alternatives. The Administrative Order on Consent (last 15 min) is supposed to look at alternatives. It’s really hard to fathom the cost of building new state of the art above ground storage tanks will be more expensive than building more monitoring wells, repairing and maintaining the tanks, implementing “new” (Watada mentions the 16 year old safety upgrades specifically designed for the tanks have yet to be implemented.)  Certainly MORE jobs would be created since in addition to building new facility/facilities we still have to deal with the clean up of toxic waste and pollution at the old one.

I found Tina Quizon’s hard hitting 15 minute interview with then (Sept 2015) Department of Health Chair Gary Gill.  While Gill tries to put a positive spin on it all, he fully corroborates the concerns of Watada and Lau.  BWS says they have formally requested that DOH share any information received from the Navy, and as we heard, that just is not happening.  Gill says several additional things equally as hair-raising as BWS.  For time reasons, we didn’t even get into the scariness of the tunnel, for instance, but Gill puts it right out there:

Tracy Burgo, the BWS Communications Officer has promised to keep me in the loop on the June meeting. A strong showing of public support for BWS’s efforts to protect our drinking water would give Dept. of Health, EPA, and the Navy a clear message that the current pace and scope of efforts is simply unacceptable. We go!

EPA 2014 leak, AOC, latest updates,  Superfund site

Department of Health,  Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Red Hill Report.

Letters Re reduction of contaminants tested for:

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Steve Chang and Bob PallarinoEPA.BWS

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4.Steve Chang and Bob PallarinoEPA.BWS

Here are the visuals from this week.

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timeline227.2.1.diagJPG 27.2.2.insidetank 27.2.3.JAN13.2014leak 27.2.4.tankcorrosionrepair 27.2.5.leak detection 27.2.6.monitor well 2 27.3.1.timeline3 27.3.2.AOC 27.3.3.BWSconsernsAOC.

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What a show.  In yesterday’s livestream we concentrated on what is there physically, the geography of the facility (first 15 min). In the second section (15-30 min) we discuss leak history and contamination evidence.  Ernie drops a bomb describing an EPA Superfund situation I was not prepared for (start at 25:00.) In the final segment we discuss the current situation on tank repairs, usage, testing.  I was so overcome by the enormity of the situation, I misspoke.  Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi is in He’eia; the issue was runoff from Kahekili Highway, not Kamehameha Highway.

We did not get into the Administrative Order on Consent signed in 2014 which maps the political geography of the situation. That will be our focus next week.  Same time, 3pm HST. Same station, ThinkTechHawaii.com. Same hydro-hero duo, Ernest and Erwin!

I’m attaching the visuals for easy perusal. Here’s the link to Honolulu Board of Water Supply’s web page dedicated to the fuel tank/aquifer issue.

26.1.3.tank diagram 26.1.4.Red Hill tank inside 1 26.2.1.chronology1 26.2.1.Red Hill - monitor well 2 copy 26.2.2.Red Hill - inside tunnel monitor wells 26.2.3.contaminated groundwater 500ft 26.2.4.coresamples 26.3.1.2010Audit 26.3.2corrosionschematic 26.3.3.OahuMap

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Red Hill WellsLast Friday I spent an hour and a half with three senior members of the Honolulu Board of Water supply, Ernest Y.W. Lau, P.E.; Manager and Chief Engineer, Erwin Kawata; Program Administrator, Water Quality Division and Tracy Burgo; Information Specialist.

Here’s what I learned. There are 20 WWII era tanks with a combined fuel storage capacity of 250,000,000 gallons which have been leaking irregularly since built. The leaky tanks are 100 feet above the aquifer that provides drinking water to Oahuans from Moanalua to Hawaii Kai. Even though it was April 1st, none of them were fooling.

Tomorrow Lau and Kawata will go over some staggering data. Join us at 3pm HST. on Think Tech Hawaii for livestreamed coverage. If  YOU have a question, tweet us @ThinkTechHI. If you can’t watch live, I will post the YouTube video within  24 hours here at KauiLucas.com

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When it’s all over mid- September, I wonder how Chipper Wichman Jr. is going to feel, having been the spark that began the years-long process to bring the IUCN’s World Conservation Conference, themed “Planet at the Crossroads” to Hawai’i.  Before we livestreamed yesterday, I asked Randall Tanaka what message was most important for him to communicate. His answer surprised me: legacy.   How will we in this host community- whether we participate directly or indirectly -leverage the opportunities it is providing?

We don’t have to wait until September.  Opportunities are already happening.  Justice Antonio Herman Benjamin, who serves on the World Commission on Environmental Law of the IUCN, was in town visiting fishponds (conservation projects) and speaking.  I caught part of a breakfast gathering both he and Randall Tanaka were featured in at the Department of Land and Natural resources Friday. It was a live demonstration of the way experts from very different conservation experiences can assist us in avoiding catastrophic resource degradation, and mitigating the damages we have already sustained, most effectively.

A couple of friends have inquired about where to sign up to volunteer at the IUCN Congress: here.

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Breakfast Gathering at DLNR with (facing left to right) Professor Denise E. Antolini Richardson Law School, DLNR first deputy Kekoa Kaluhiwa, Justice Antionio H. Benjamin of Brazil’s High Court, Associate Justice Michael D. Wilson of Hawaiʻi Supreme Court, and Randall Tanaka, Executive Director, Hawai’i’s World Conservation Congress National Host Committee

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iucn_2016_logo_h_en_colour_high_resWhen the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) meets in Waikiki this September 1 to 10, it will be the first time in its 66-year history that the world’s largest conservation conference will be hosted by the United States.

Attendees from 160 different countries will include first people’s organizations, scientists, business interests, politicians, policy makers, educators, NGOs, experts in the fields of environment and climate change.  What role will our extensive and diverse conservation community play?  Randall Tanaka, Executive Director of Hawai’i’s World Conservation Congress National Host Committee will answer questions about the role for local organizations.  Tweet your questions to @thinktechHI, and watch us livestreamed: Think Tech Hawaii 3pm HST today.

Randy Tanaka

 

 

 

 

 

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