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Posts Tagged ‘Hawai’i is My Mainland’

What a show.  In yesterday’s livestream we concentrated on what is there physically, the geography of the facility (first 15 min). In the second section (15-30 min) we discuss leak history and contamination evidence.  Ernie drops a bomb describing an EPA Superfund situation I was not prepared for (start at 25:00.) In the final segment we discuss the current situation on tank repairs, usage, testing.  I was so overcome by the enormity of the situation, I misspoke.  Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi is in He’eia; the issue was runoff from Kahekili Highway, not Kamehameha Highway.

We did not get into the Administrative Order on Consent signed in 2014 which maps the political geography of the situation. That will be our focus next week.  Same time, 3pm HST. Same station, ThinkTechHawaii.com. Same hydro-hero duo, Ernest and Erwin!

I’m attaching the visuals for easy perusal. Here’s the link to Honolulu Board of Water Supply’s web page dedicated to the fuel tank/aquifer issue.

26.1.3.tank diagram 26.1.4.Red Hill tank inside 1 26.2.1.chronology1 26.2.1.Red Hill - monitor well 2 copy 26.2.2.Red Hill - inside tunnel monitor wells 26.2.3.contaminated groundwater 500ft 26.2.4.coresamples 26.3.1.2010Audit 26.3.2corrosionschematic 26.3.3.OahuMap

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Red Hill WellsLast Friday I spent an hour and a half with three senior members of the Honolulu Board of Water supply, Ernest Y.W. Lau, P.E.; Manager and Chief Engineer, Erwin Kawata; Program Administrator, Water Quality Division and Tracy Burgo; Information Specialist.

Here’s what I learned. There are 20 WWII era tanks with a combined fuel storage capacity of 250,000,000 gallons which have been leaking irregularly since built. The leaky tanks are 100 feet above the aquifer that provides drinking water to Oahuans from Moanalua to Hawaii Kai. Even though it was April 1st, none of them were fooling.

Tomorrow Lau and Kawata will go over some staggering data. Join us at 3pm HST. on Think Tech Hawaii for livestreamed coverage. If  YOU have a question, tweet us @ThinkTechHI. If you can’t watch live, I will post the YouTube video within  24 hours here at KauiLucas.com

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When it’s all over mid- September, I wonder how Chipper Wichman Jr. is going to feel, having been the spark that began the years-long process to bring the IUCN’s World Conservation Conference, themed “Planet at the Crossroads” to Hawai’i.  Before we livestreamed yesterday, I asked Randall Tanaka what message was most important for him to communicate. His answer surprised me: legacy.   How will we in this host community- whether we participate directly or indirectly -leverage the opportunities it is providing?

We don’t have to wait until September.  Opportunities are already happening.  Justice Antonio Herman Benjamin, who serves on the World Commission on Environmental Law of the IUCN, was in town visiting fishponds (conservation projects) and speaking.  I caught part of a breakfast gathering both he and Randall Tanaka were featured in at the Department of Land and Natural resources Friday. It was a live demonstration of the way experts from very different conservation experiences can assist us in avoiding catastrophic resource degradation, and mitigating the damages we have already sustained, most effectively.

A couple of friends have inquired about where to sign up to volunteer at the IUCN Congress: here.

blnr

Breakfast Gathering at DLNR with (facing left to right) Professor Denise E. Antolini Richardson Law School, DLNR first deputy Kekoa Kaluhiwa, Justice Antionio H. Benjamin of Brazil’s High Court, Associate Justice Michael D. Wilson of Hawaiʻi Supreme Court, and Randall Tanaka, Executive Director, Hawai’i’s World Conservation Congress National Host Committee

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iucn_2016_logo_h_en_colour_high_resWhen the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) meets in Waikiki this September 1 to 10, it will be the first time in its 66-year history that the world’s largest conservation conference will be hosted by the United States.

Attendees from 160 different countries will include first people’s organizations, scientists, business interests, politicians, policy makers, educators, NGOs, experts in the fields of environment and climate change.  What role will our extensive and diverse conservation community play?  Randall Tanaka, Executive Director of Hawai’i’s World Conservation Congress National Host Committee will answer questions about the role for local organizations.  Tweet your questions to @thinktechHI, and watch us livestreamed: Think Tech Hawaii 3pm HST today.

Randy Tanaka

 

 

 

 

 

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They’re here! They are fabulous! They are the next generation rising to take their place at democracy’s table in Hawai’i.  The process of choosing delegates is far more circuitous than I had any idea of.  Cameron Sato and Elliot Van Wie do a great job of describing that in the fist section, as well as part of the second. Definitely watch the first 10 minutes if you are planning to vote Saturday the 26th in Hawai’i’s Democratic Preference Poll.

At about 26:00  Cameron Sato gives at truly unique argument for voting for Bernie, addressing head on the concerns about Sander’s age.

And yes, that is the same locally made Princess Kaiulani Fashion‘s custom mu’u mu’u I wore in the final “luau” episode of the 1994 This Old House series on my then home at Niu. And yes, the scarf is Kealopiko,  from several years ago. And no, they are not sponsoring this blog.

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Katie Kamelamela, Botany PhD.

Katie Kamelamela, Na’i Aupuni ‘Aha participant, UH Manoa Botany PhD candidate

In the summer of 2012 I had the  life altering privilege of participating in the 5 day ‘Ai Pono Ola Pono (healthy eating – healthy living) Huaka’i to Kaho‘olawe Island with ‘Ahahui O Nā Kauka, a gathering of Native Hawaiian doctors, nurses, farmers and other health and food practitioners.

The purpose was to strengthen the connection between healthy local food systems and improved health and wellness outcomes for clinicians. That’s where I met Katie Kamelamela. Then a Botany graduate student at the University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa; she impressed me with her intellectual, scientific, Hawaiian cultural and physical strengths.

A couple of months ago I wrote about her remarkable profile as a Na‘i Aupuni candidate. Friday March 18th at 3pm HST on Think Tech Hawaii she and I will be talking about her experience as a participant in the recent Na‘i Aupuni ‘Aha.  Her voice is clear and compellingly holistic. Watch our livestreamed program to hear a future for Hawai‘i from a refreshing voice.

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The most useful blog in my world is Hawaii Agriculture. They keep current, and really cover the field (and sometimes stray into the ocean and forest.)  A recent post alerted me to potential perils in the produce section: http://hawaii-agriculture.com/hawaii-agriculture-blog/west-hawaii-today-features-food-sustainability-a-kona-vores-dilemma, right here in Kona.  The issue is produce that isn’t local, being sold as such,  sometimes mixed into the same bin with local produce.  Talk about a hot topic for local farmers!

But I was just thinking about what to cook for dinner while shopping the next day at my favorite local natural food store, Island Naturals Market & Deli.  I like them so much I kind of felt bad about writing  this post, but hey, as ye show, so shall ye reap.   I found some gorgeous organic courgettes.  No price, no problem, friendly Produce Man is 6 feet away.  He dug around and put up the tag.   The price for not going to the Farmer’s market, $2.99 a lb, but they are deep green, and gorgeous, and . . . they’re from MEXICO???

Trying to stay off my soap-box, I  said to Produce Man as innocently as I could, “the tag says ‘Mainland,’ but the labels say they’re from Mexico (organic at least).”   He stuttered a bit and said something about only having “local” and “mainland” tags, and admitted there was a problem with about four of their products.  I couldn’t help saying, “Hawaii’ is my mainland, by the way, but the point is Mexico is a foreign country with different standards for organic.”

“I’m from Sweden,”  he smiled, ”  I see your point, and I hope by the next time you come in we’ll have that fixed.”  He could have argued that there are more Kona area residents native to Mexico, than are native to any other of the “States” not on the West Coast.  Like I said,  Produce Man is a nice guy. Now that I’ve done some research, it looks like Mexico’s standards are ok.  STILL!   I had to go back the next day as it turns out, and the signs remained the same– but that’s not much of a grace period for corporate policy changes.

A few days later I’m at my favorite conventional supermarket, KTA.  The same cute Mexican courgettes with the yellow label (my phone camera doesn’t have a flash) are in the organic produce section.

the pretty courgettes from Mexico

The nearest origin tags say “product of USA.”   KTA has tracks on the shelf edges to put the tags on, and they don’t specifically reference the item they refer to.   So, I just turned the “product of USA”  label over.

Back to the Hawaii Agriculture blog.  What about local-not-necessarily-organic  vs organic imports? The BBC writes in a great little article, “Local food is usually more “green” than organic food, according to a report published in the journal Food Policy.”

PS-

Safeway’s label takes the cake for localwannabe:

product of Kenya

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